Increased risk of developing certain cancers

An individual’s risk for developing a specific type of cancer, for example, breast cancer, is different from the risk for a person who is genetically predisposed to developing breast cancer. It is not possible to predict the risk of developing a specific type of cancer.

All cancers are rare. It is estimated that the chance of developing a specific type of cancer in the U.S. population is 1 in 100,000 for males and 1 in 200,000 for females.

Even if you have a family history of cancer, there is no guarantee that you will develop it. People with a family history of cancer have a higher risk than people without a family history of cancer.

Your chances of developing cancer are increased by:

Being male. Males are more likely to develop certain cancers than females. This is due to a higher incidence of certain types of cancers in males.

Males are more likely to develop certain cancers than females. This is due to a higher incidence of certain types of cancers in males. Having a family history of cancer. Having a family history of cancer increases your risk of developing certain cancers.

Having a family history of cancer increases your risk of developing certain cancers. Being overweight. Being overweight increases your risk of developing certain cancers.

Being overweight increases your risk of developing certain cancers. Being a smoker. Smokers have a higher risk of developing certain cancers.

Smokers have a higher risk of developing certain cancers. Being a drinker. People who drink alcohol have a higher risk of developing certain cancers.

People who drink alcohol have a higher risk of developing certain cancers. Being older. Having an advanced age (i.e., older age of 65 or older) increases your risk of developing certain cancers.

Having an advanced age (i.e., older age of 65 or older) increases your risk of developing certain cancers. Taking certain medications. Certain medications may increase your risk of developing certain cancers.

Certain medications may increase your risk of developing certain cancers. Getting cancer during pregnancy. Having a previous history of cancer in your family may increase your risk of developing certain cancers during pregnancy.

Complications

If a cancer is diagnosed, the following may happen:

Cancer may spread. A cancer may spread to other parts of your body (cancers that are not cancerous may be called “non-cancerous”). This is known as metastasis.

A cancer may spread to other parts of your body (cancers that are not cancerous may be called “non-cancerous”). This is known as metastasis. Other problems may occur. For example, a cancer may spread to other organs, or it may cause other problems, such as blood clots or breathing problems.

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